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tuning suspension on a Dawg 06
Guest_Nuuk_*
post May 28 2007, 10:14 AM
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Hi,
I've bought my Dawg Deluxe a few month ago. I usually do longer tours, but if there's a downhill I go for it. I am quite happy with my suspension adjustments, but if there are little drops on the downhills the suspension bottoms likely. As I feel uncomfortable raising the pressure, I am thinking about getting a more progressive behavior through changing oil levels.
Just wanted to know what you think about that before I start probably wasting time & money?

I also feel that the brakes are a little too small on longer downhills. Would it be possible to mount bigger brakes on a 06 Dawg?
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tech
post May 28 2007, 04:50 PM
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Start by just comfirming the fork has the correct oil level right now. Then go from there. How much do you hit the scale at with all your normal riding gear on?

I've heard some folks have run 7" rotors but it's a real test and confirm clearance thing, You could think it was OK and wind up flexing the frame into the rotor while rolling.


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Guest_Nuuk_*
post May 29 2007, 09:38 AM
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thank you,
I weigh about 64-68 kg (141-149 lbs) depending on what I have to take with me.

Which oil would you recommend. Maybe you know anything available in Germany?
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tech
post May 29 2007, 02:25 PM
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The stock springs will be fine for your weight. Low oil seems the likely culprit.

I've always used motorcycle cartridge fork oil in Marzocchi forks. The brands I've used have been Motul and Golden Spectro, and the weight 125/150. If you can't find those then see what the bike shops there have used with success. Some oils will contaminate and damage the composite internal parts.


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Guest_Nuuk_*
post May 29 2007, 04:45 PM
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emm, I didn't thought I have springs in there - just thought they work using air and oil.
do you know the basic oil level for the gran fondo 1? didn't find that on the marzocchi site for that fork.
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tech
post May 29 2007, 04:54 PM
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The last one I peeled open had springs, but maybe Marzocchi has the small chamber air fork dialed now. From what I recall in my dusty memorey we found the air only ramped fast and rebounded faster. The other thing that can catch me is sometimes we'll get a version of a bike that isn't quite the same as what Europe gets, or Europe will get a colour or fork spec we don't see.

Back to the point, you're average so there's no reason the stock fork setup normally with a couple adjustments won't work. If you were 30 or 175 Kilos then there would be some real tuning to be done.


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Guest_Nuuk_*
post May 30 2007, 01:17 PM
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sorry, I was wrong. just had another look at the marzocchi manual and the gran fondo indeed uses a spring.
so, one last stupid question, as this is my first fork I am going to open - but no worry I ve been a car mechanic a few years ago.
will I need any new seals when changing oil level or could I reuse the old ones?
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tech
post May 30 2007, 02:56 PM
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No problem, Marzocchi has many different forks that appear the same with varied internals. No need to worry about the main seals, to adjust oil you only need to remove the top caps you don't have to tear the fork apart.


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Guest_Nuuk_*
post May 31 2007, 10:04 AM
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thank you.
will also have a try to mount the rear shock in the back position and see if that solves my issues.
will keep you up to date.
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Guest_Nuuk_*
post Jun 5 2007, 11:45 AM
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Hi,
unfortunately I haven't been able to get oil for the marzocchi fork from my local dealer, so I ordered some Motorex 7,5W online. I emailed Marzocchi regarding correct oil levels, but didn't get an answer yet (Fork is not listed on their online list).
I tried using the rear mounting point for the rear shock and I experienced some improvement. Though it surely reaches its limit in tough situations, I didn't really bottom until now - so, that feels better now.
As I ve just been checking pressure levels: I'm currently using 165 psi rear and 40 psi front.
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tech
post Jun 5 2007, 02:25 PM
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Most folks won't use a volume as that means you need to drain the oil and measure, but instead they'll use height so you can measure with a minimal tear down.

In general here's the rule for all forks to check oil. Caps off, springs out if you have them, compress legs and measure from the lip of the stanchion to the top of the oil. I usually use an old spoke to measure with.

Let me know what you've got.


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Guest_Nuuk_*
post Jul 9 2007, 03:06 PM
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hey tech,

sorry, I had a very busy time and haven't been able to check oil level of my fork in the meantime - but I have found some adjustment, that works okay so far.
The other thing is, that I found that my riding turned out a little more aggressive than it used to. For example when I go out for shopping I like to drop the stairs that are on my way - which are about 1,5m height. Every time I read the sign 'do not use for freeride / dirt jumper' on my fork, I feel guilty.. I also would like to take my bike to a bike park, even if I will not do the real big drops the next time - I was wondering if a Freerider, that is capable to be used for doing longer tours wouldn't be better for me and that I will just break my bike in the long term? what do you think?
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tech
post Jul 9 2007, 03:17 PM
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A meter and a half stair gap and a Marzocchi XC fork is a bad combo. They're very unforgiving now about broken forks becuase they were badly taken advantage of in the past so not much slips through the cracks.

I think now is the time to decide what kind of riding you want to do and if it's Freeride then to swap out the Dawg for another bike before it's worn out. If the jumps are just an occasional thing then maybe one of the DJ hardtails could be an affordable backup bike.


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Guest_Nuuk_*
post Jul 9 2007, 05:17 PM
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well It's not just the fork. How will the other components take this?
Well it's something like, I like to do all of it. I take my bike to university in the morning - it's about 16 km - it involves everything from uphill to nice downhill tracks. I would like to have a bike that won't limit me. Which will take me up the hill, but also won't mind going down fast again or doing some drops. I know it will always be some kind of compromise, but I fear the dawg might be overstrained at some point?
At the moment it looks like, that I will spend the next half year in the USA, so selling my bike now and getting a new one when I come back to Germany wouldn't be that bad.
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tech
post Jul 9 2007, 05:50 PM
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That sounds like the kind of riding I do on a Coilair.


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